Rare Earths Stocks
A comprehensive list of Rare Earths stocks trading on U.S. exchanges and OTC markets

Rare Earths Stocks by Market Cap

Rare Earths Market Key Terms

Heavy Rare Earth Elements

    • The subset of Rare Earth Elements (REEs) with an atomic number between 63 and 71.
    • HREEs are typically less common and more valuable than LREEs.
    • Dysprosium (Dy), terbium (Tb), and europium (Eu) are among the most valuable HREEs.

Light Rare Earth Elements

  • The subset of Rare Earth Elements (REEs) with an atomic number between 57 and 62.
  • LREEs are more abundant than HREEs.
  • Neodymium (Nd) and praseodymium (Pr) are among the most valuable LREEs and are essential to the production of powerful magnets.

REE Concentrate

  • Rare Earth Element (REE) Concentrate is semi-processed ore that contains a high level of REEs.
  • This is an intemediate product and is further processed to produce individual rare earth oxides or metals.

REO Equivalent

  • Rare Earth Oxides (REO) Equivalent is a common metric in the rare earth mining industry to measure the value and purity of REE concentrate.
  • For example, in the 2022 MP Materials Annual Report:
    • "The aggregate global market for rare earth oxides (“REO”) totaled approximately 186,000 metric tons (“MTs”) in 2022 and is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate (“CAGR”) of approximately 4.1% through 2030, according to research by the CRU Group (“CRU”). Further, CRU estimates that the NdPr segment of the REO market, which makes up the significant majority of the market value, is expected to grow at an 8.6% CAGR through 2030 (excluding the impact of closed loop recycling), well in excess of the overall REO market. This expected growth will be driven by secular growth in demand for NdPr magnets."

NdPr

  • Refers to neodymium (Nd) and praseodymium (Pr), two elements used to produce rare earth magnets.
  • The NdPr price is a key indicator of current demand for REEs.

Selected Rare Earths Stocks 5Y Performance

Rare Earths Investing FAQ

What are Rare Earths?
  • 17 chemically similar elements, grouped together due to their unique magnetic and conductive properties.
  • REEs are easily oxidized and have high melting points.
  • The 17 elements are:
    • Scandium (Sc), Yttrium (Y), Lanthanum (La), Cerium (Ce), Praseodymium (Pr), Neodymium (Nd), Promethium (Pm), Samarium (Sm), Europium (Eu), Gadolinium (Gd), Terbium (Tb), Dysprosium (Dy), Holmium (Ho), Erbium (Er), Thulium (Tm), Ytterbium (Yb), Lutetium (Lu).
Which country mines the most Rare Earths?
  • China is the leading producer of mined natural graphite, with an estimated 70% of global mine production in 2022.
  • Following China are the United States (14.3%) and Australia (6%).

Source: U.S. Geological Survey 2023 Mineral Commodity Summaries.

What is the largest Rare Earths mine in the world?
  • The Bayan Obo Mine in Inner Mongolia, China is the world’s largest Rare Earths mine.
  • Bayan Obo accounted for almost 60% of global mine production in 2020 and nearly 40% of global reserves, as reported by the Japan Times.
  • The Baotou Iron and Steel Group, a Chinese state-owned enterprise and the world’s largest rare earths mining company, has exclusive mining rights to Bayan Obo.
How rare are Rare Earths?
  • Rare earth elements are not that rare, with over 800 proven deposits in the world according to the University of Delaware’s Julie Klinger.
  • REEs were thought to be rare when they were first discovered in the 1700s, and the name has stuck since.
  • Despite the relative abundance, mineable concentrations of Rare Earth elements are relatively rare.
  • Rare Earths mines also produce radioactive waste, and thus are not feasible near population centers.
How are Rare Earths used in the Energy Transition?
  • Electric Vehicles
    • The high-performance magnets in EV motors contain neodymium, praseodymium, and dysprosium.
  • Wind Turbines
    • Permanent magnets are also essential components for wind turbines.
  • Solar Panels
    • Thin-film solar PV cells contain REEs such as lanthanum and cerium.

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